My Blog
By Dr. Orman
March 16, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Care   Diabetes   Diabetics  

Summertime brings flip-flops, pool time and more. While these are the signs of enjoyable warm weather, they can also be concerning if you have diabetes. Higher temperatures and opportunities to walk barefoot increase the chances you can injure your feet or experience cracking, swelling and discomfort.

Because you are living with diabetes, you likely know the condition puts you at greater risk for nerve damage to your feet. This affects your foot sensations, meaning you may experience a scrape or cut without realizing you had it. Because diabetes affects your body’s wound healing time, having a cut that’s unknown to you can easily turn into a more serious wound if left untreated.

To ensure your feet have an event-free summer, here are some warm weather-specific tips from our podiatrist.

Always wear shoes. If you’re planning a beach vacation, it can be tempting to leave the flip-flops behind in favor of sand beneath your toes. This can be a troublesome habit, however, because it increases your risk for cuts from seashells, beach glass or other unknown beach items. Close-toed beach shoes that have breathable mesh and a protective sole are available that protect your feet from injury while also allowing you to walk comfortably.

Give your feet a once-over twice daily. When you have diabetes, you should inspect your feet at least as often as you should brush your teeth: at least twice per day. Pay special attention to the areas between your toes and underneath your feet. You may even want to get a mirror to place on the ground and put your foot a few inches away to identify hard-to-see areas. In addition to checking out your feet, you’ll also want to check out your shoes. Debris, such as dirt and rocks, can easily accumulate in your shoes and cause injuries. Give them a good shake before wearing to protect yourself.

Don’t forget to apply sunscreen. You can just as easily burn your foot skin as you can anywhere else, yet many people forget to apply sunscreen to this important area. When you are applying sunscreen to your arms, legs and face, don’t forget to apply it on the tops and bottoms of your feet before putting on your outdoor shoes.

Don’t feel the burn. Remember the beach isn't the only place you can burn or injure your feet. Campfires, cookouts and even ultra-hot pavement are all areas where you can unexpectedly injure your feet in the summer. The same rules apply when it comes to wearing shoes and taking every precaution to protect your feet.

Finally, remember that it’s important to see a podiatrist regularly to inspect your feet and ensure you have not experienced an injury that could easily affect your overall health. Visiting our podiatrist to have your toenails cut can help to prevent ingrown toenails and injury. If you notice other foot conditions, such as blisters or scrapes, seeing us as quickly as possible can help to prevent your injuries from worsening.

By Dr. Orman
March 08, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Heel Pain  

How your podiatrist in Perry Hall and Fallston can helpheel pain

Heel pain is a common problem. It’s also very uncomfortable and it can be debilitating. Fortunately, there are some tips and tricks to deal with heel pain so you can get back to living your life. Dr. Edward Orman at Honeygo Podiatry in Perry Hall and Fallston, MD wants to share the facts about treating your heel pain.

Heel pain has a few different causes. It can be caused by bruising from stepping on sharp objects. It can also be caused by bone spurs or calcium deposits on your heel. The most common reason for heel pain is a condition known as plantar fasciitis in which the plantar fascia, the thick ligament running from the toes to your heel, becomes inflamed.

You can get plantar fasciitis from standing or walking on hard surfaces for long periods, or if you are a runner. You’re also prone to plantar fasciitis if you are overweight.

If you are experiencing heel pain, try this:

  • Do arch stretches during the day
  • Wear supportive shoes with heel inserts or padding

For severe heel pain that doesn’t respond to home therapy, Dr. Orman can help. He may suggest:

  • Stretching and physical therapy to increase mobility
  • Custom orthotics and night splints to protect your feet
  • Prescription medications to reduce inflammation and pain
  • Cortisone injections to reduce swelling and inflammation

If non-invasive treatments don’t work, surgical therapy might be indicated. Dr. Orman will discuss surgical options with you and create a custom treatment plan designed to get you back on your feet.

For more detailed information and frequently asked questions about heel pain and treatment please visit the Heel Pain page on Dr. Orman’s website at

You can get relief from heel pain, so act fast to prevent your heel pain from disrupting your life. Don’t suffer. Instead, pick up the phone and call Dr. Orman at Honeygo Podiatry in Perry Hall and Fallston, MD. Get started on the road to recovery by calling today!

By Dr. Orman
March 06, 2018
Category: Foot Care

America has carried on a love affair with sports since its inception. Whether you are a professionalSports Injuries athlete, play in youth or adult teams or have pickup games with friends, your feet and ankles take a beating while playing sports.  

All vigorous sports should be played sensibly and safely. Improper preparation and techniques can lead to injury, especially in the lower extremities. Athletes of all levels should be aware of the various risks and potential sports injuries of playing the game. With the guidance of your podiatrist, you can avoid sports injuries and life on the bench. 

Common Sports Injuries

Any sport offers a number of different ways to injure your feet and ankles. For instance, in baseball alone, ankle sprains may occur while running, fielding balls, stepping on or sliding into bases.

Your podiatrist will help to determine the extent of the injury and develop a treatment plan to guide you through the healing process. Failure to fully treat and rehabilitate a sprain may lead to chronic ankle instability and recurrent sprains.

Overuse or excessive training can also put some athletes on the bench with Achilles tendinitis or heel pain. The start and stop of many sports often creates pain and tightness in the calf and aggravation of the Achilles tendon. Regular, gentle and gradual stretching of the calf muscles before and after the game will help minimize the pain and stiffness. 

Protect Your Feet: Wear Appropriate Shoes

There seems to be a shoe designed for every sport out there, but there is a method to the varying styles. Sport-specific shoes really can change your game and protect your feet from injury. There is no danger in wearing cleats, but they should be gradually introduced before being worn in the game. A young player needs to get a feel for cleats, which should not be worn off of the field.  

While the improved traction of cleats may enhance play, it also leaves your ankles more susceptible to twists and turns. Anyone with pre-existing foot conditions should see a podiatrist before putting on cleats, and never wear hand-me-downs. Spikes, which are made to be lighter and more flexible these days, perform the same function as cleats, but engage with the ground differently. These should also be worn with caution until the feel of how they engage with the turf is understood. 

Watch for irritation, blisters or redness while wearing cleats, because they can indicate a biomechanical problem in the legs or feet. Pain is a sure sign of a problem and should be addressed immediately. If wearing cleats causes you pain, discontinue wearing them for a couple days and visit your foot doctor for further treatment and diagnosis. 

When it comes to sports, it is important to protect your feet from injury. Activities such as football, baseball, soccer, field hockey and lacrosse often lead to ankle injuries as a result of play on artificial surfaces, improper footwear or inadequate stretching. Contact your podiatrist if you exhibit any injuries after playing your favorite sport. Your podiatrist can treat you and offer prevention techniques, so you aren't benched for the rest of the season.

It is important to raise awareness for diabetes, but what does that mean for your feet? If you have diabetes, you may understand the importance of proper care and maintenance of your blood sugar levels. However, did you know that the health of your feet directly relates to your diabetes as well? 

Your podiatrist understands the importance of diabetic foot care, which is why they continue to raise awareness for the importance of proper diabetic foot care. Your podiatrist is available to provide you with some helpful tips for caring for your feet if you suffer from diabetes. Let’s take a look at some helpful tips.

The 5 Helpful Tips for Diabetic Foot Care

The importance of understanding how to care for your feet, whether you have diabetes or not, can't be underestimated. Here are the top 5 tips your podiatrist wants to emphasize for diabetic foot care:

  1. Inspect Your Feet Daily – When it comes to your feet, daily inspection is vital in the maintenance of your health. Even the smallest prick can cause immense pain and infection. 
  2. Wash Your Feet in Lukewarm Water – Do not wash your feet in ice cold water or scalding hot water, as these can cause harm to your feet. When washing, remember to use lukewarm water so that you do not irritate your feet.  
  3. Cut Your Nails Carefully – By taking care when you cut your nails, you can prevent ingrown toenails, while also preventing cuts or other complications. Make sure to cut your nails straight across, rather than curved or at an angle.
  4. Never Treat Corns or Calluses Yourself – We all know how tempting it can be to perform home surgery on your corns or calluses, but please refrain from doing so! By attempting to treat your corns or calluses, you are putting the health of your feet at risk for infection and other complications.
  5. Take Care of Your Diabetes – This tip may seem like an obvious one, but we cannot reiterate it enough—take care of your diabetes. If you properly care for your diabetes, you are paving the way for health and success.

By following these guidelines laid out by your podiatrist, we hope that you will continue to take care of your feet. If you have diabetes, constant monitoring of your feet is very important. Remember to look for puncture wounds, bruises, pressure areas, redness, warmth, blisters and ulcers, and to contact us immediately if you notice any of these things.

Toenail fungus affects nearly 20 percent of the population and is one of the most common foot conditions that is treated by your podiatrist. Characterized by thick, disfigured, yellow nails, this recurring disorder can cause the nail to grow fragile, brittle and loose, and, in some cases, to crumble away. In the most severe cases, infected nails may even cause pain or difficulty walking. 

Fungi thrive in warm, moist environments and can spread from person to person. Like athlete’s foot, you can contract a fungal nail infection from simply walking barefoot in public showers or pools or by sharing nail clippers or shoes. Fungal infections can also infect fingernails, but toenails are more difficult to treat as toenails typically grow more slowly. By following simple preventive measures from your podiatrist, you can take the next step to healthy, attractive feet. 

How to Prevent Pesky Toenail Fungus 

Toenail fungus is common, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be easily prevented. By following these simple guidelines from your podiatrist, you can take the next step toward healthy feet:   

  • Wear shower shoes at public pools and locker rooms.
  • Never share nail clippers or files.
  • Wear dry shoes that allow air to circulate around your feet.
  • Avoid injury to your nail, such as cutting it too short.
  • Inspect your feet and toes regularly.
  • Trim your toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenail infections.
  • Wear open-toed shoes if weather permits.
  • Avoid wearing nail polish and disinfect pedicure tools.
  • Wear clean, dry cotton socks that provide breathing room and whisk away moisture.

And if you are unable to avoid the development of toenail fungus, a trip to your podiatrist will do the trick. Your podiatrist will work with you to determine the best treatment plan for eliminating your toenail fungus, while also offering helpful advice for ways to prevent the development of this pesky infection.

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