My Blog
By Dr. Orman
September 18, 2017
Tags: Lisfranc Fracture  

Any fracture to the foot or ankle should be taken seriously, but a Lisfranc fracture is particularly concerning for podiatrists. Because the fracture happens at the center of the foot where there are many connections, without prompt treatment this problem can significantly reduce your ability to walk or participate in athletic activities. The worse the fracture gets, the harder it is to treat. Learn more about Lisfranc fractures to see if this might be the foot problem you're experiencing.

What Is a Lisfranc Fracture?
When the bones at the center of the foot become fractured, broken or shift out of place it is called a Lisfranc injury. The ligaments that hold the bones together and cartilage at joints can also tear. This can happen when a heavy object falls on the foot, the patient has a bad fall or the foot twists unnaturally. Athletes, like soccer and football players, may be at risk for Lisfranc fractures. 

Why It’s a Concern
A Lisfranc fracture is a major concern for podiatrists because if it is allowed to go untreated for an extended period of time it can lead to a disability of the foot. It often causes the bottom of the foot to swell, bruise and become darkly discolored (a telltale sign of a Lisfranc fracture). It can also be a very painful condition that is difficult to ignore.

Lisfranc Fracture Treatments
Your foot doctor will take X-rays to confirm that you have a Lisfranc injury. If so, conservative treatments may be implemented first, including wearing a removable cast or an orthotic device that will train your bones and joints into a position for healing. In a severe case where there’s a clear fracture or severe subluxation of the bones, you may have to have foot surgery. Two common surgical solutions are fusion (healing the bones together) and internal fixation (involves the use of screws and other devices to repair the foot).

Talk to a Podiatrist
The earlier you seek treatment for a Lisfranc fracture, the better for your long-term foot health. Your podiatrist will discuss your options and come up with an ideal plan for fixing the problem. Call a foot doctor today to schedule an exam and get an official diagnosis.

By Dr. Orman
September 08, 2017
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Bunion  

Bunions can make daily functions and activities, such as walking or jogging, uncomfortable and even painful. The only way to eliminate bunionsbunions is through professional treatment from an experienced podiatrist. Bunions will not go away on their own. Dr. Edward Orman at Honeygo Podiatry in Perry Hall, Maryland and serving Baltimore is your podiatrist for treatment of bunions.

What Are Bunions?

When the big toe moves out of place, bony protrusions known as bunions can form on the sides of the feet just below the big toe. Bunions are easily irritated when footwear rubs against them. The friction caused by this rubbing motion can aggravate bunions, causing them to become inflamed, which can be extremely painful. Additionally, shoes and footwear often feel tighter and less comfortable following the development of bunions.

Treatment Options

Bunions will not heal on their own. Medical treatment from a podiatrist is the only way to get rid of them. Various treatment options are available for removing bunions. Other treatments prevent bunions from growing and protruding more than they already do. There are also treatments for correcting the alignment of the big toe and joint so they are no longer out of place, the initial cause of the bunions.

  • Performing foot exercises to improve joint functioning and prevent stiffness.
  • Wearing bigger shoes with extra room in the bunion area.
  • Wearing protective padding inside the shoes to minimize rubbing.
  • Wearing orthotics to correct foot positioning and stabilize the inflamed toe joint.
  • Wearing splints at night to realign the toe and joint that is out of place.
  • Undergoing foot surgery to remove bunions and correct toe alignment.

Bunions are associated with pain and discomfort. Fortunately, there are several options for treating your bunions. For treatment of bunions, schedule an appointment with Dr. Orman at Honeygo Podiatry in Perry Hall, Maryland and serving Baltimore.

By Dr. Orman
September 08, 2017
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Claw Toes   Mallet Toes  

Understanding Claw and Mallet Toes

 

Think you may have mallet or claw toes? Mallet and claw toes form over years and are common in adults. Mallet and claw toes are among the most common toe problems. If you think you have mallet or claw toes, see a podiatrist right away. If you don't treat the problem right away, you are more likely to need surgery. Here's what you need to know about claw and mallet toes.

What Are Mallet and Claw Toes?

Mallet and claw toes are toes that are bent into an abnormal position. They may hurt or look odd, or both. These toe deformities usually occur in the small toes, not the big toes. Claw toe often affects the four small toes at the same time. The toes bend up at the joint where the foot and toes meet. This causes the toes to curl downward. Mallet toes often affect the second toes, but it may occur in the other toes too. Mallet toes bend down at the joint closest to the tip of the toes. 

What Causes These Conditions?

Tight footwear is the most common cause of mallet and claw toes. Wearing tight footwear can cause the muscles of the toes to get out of balance. Less often, these conditions are linked with other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, stroke, or an injury to the ankle or foot. Women are affected more often than men because they are more likely to wear narrow shoes or high heels.

How Are They Diagnosed?

Your podiatrist will take a detailed medical history and ask about your daily activities and footwear. A physical examination comes next, in which the level of deformity and scope of pain will be assessed. Diagnosis of these claw and mallet toes is usually obvious from the physical exam. To further evaluate the joints and bones of your feet and confirm a diagnosis, your podiatrist may order x-rays or other imaging tests.

How Are They Treated?

Buying shoes with more room in the toes, filing down calluses and corns, and padding the toes most often relieve the pain. If you have pain, your doctor may put a splint or pad on the toe. A custom orthotic device may be placed in your shoe to help control the muscle/tendon imbalance and alleviate your pain. This keeps the toe from rubbing on the top of the shoe. Corticosteroid injections are sometimes used to ease pain and inflammation. If these steps don’t work, you may need surgery to straighten the toes.

Podiatric medicine a branch of science that is devoted to the study, diagnosis, and treatment of conditions of the ankle, foot, and lower extremity. Podiatrists diagnose and treat various foot problems, including claw and mallet toes. They offer a variety of treatments for claw and mallet toes. If you think you may have claw or mallet toes, a podiatrist in your area can help you achieve real relief.

By Dr. Orman
August 15, 2017
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Foot Blisters  

While the appearance of blisters may be embarrassing, the pain accompanying them is often much worse and more of a concern for people who have them. Although blisters are a common foot problem experienced by many, have you ever wondered what the cause of those pesky blisters could be? Or, better yet, how they can be treated?

 

Blisters:

Blisters appear on a swollen part of the foot and consist of fluid, typically clear, though, depending on the blister, the fluid may also have blood. Blisters are usually caused by repeated friction or rubbing on a specific part of your foot. Here are some examples of things that can produce that constant friction:

  • The type of footwear and how properly your shoes fit
  • Your skin type and foot type (high, low or medium arch)
  • The moisture found around your feet
  • Heavy objects you may be carrying around, like a bag pack
     

Symptoms:

While blisters are rarely filled with pus, pus can form if the blister is infected. In that case, it’s important to seek treatment as soon as possible. If you have any of the following symptoms, it’s preferable to talk to your doctor:

  • Foot Pain
  • Soreness
  • Redness
  • Swelling

While the symptoms may seem common, any persistent pain needs medical attention. Individuals with diabetes need to be especially careful. If left untreated, the blister may turn into an ulcer, leaving you susceptible to an amputation.

 

Preventive Care Treatments:

There are several precautions you can take to prevent blisters. Here are a few preventative care options:

1.      Make sure to wear proper fitting shoes

2.      Wear moisture-wicking socks

3.      Cushioned insoles are a good idea

4.      Double-socks will provide extra cushion

5.      Wear orthotics recommended by your podiatrist

6.      Use antiperspirants, powders, and lubricants to reduce moisture and friction.

 

The key to healthy feet is preventative care and referring to your foot doctor whenever you have questions or concerns. 

By Dr. Orman
August 02, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Diabetic Foot Care  

People with diabetes are prone to foot problems, often developing from a combination of poor circulation and nerve damage. Damage to the nerves in the legs and feet diminishes skin sensation, making it difficult to detect or notice pain or temperature changes. A minor sore or scrape on your foot may get infected simply because you don't know it is there. A decrease in blood flow makes it difficult for these injuries to heal. And when a wound isn't healing, it's at risk for infection. Left untreated, minor foot injuries can result in ulceration and even amputation.

Foot Care for Diabetics

Simple daily foot care can help prevent serious health problems associated with diabetes.

We recommend the following tips for keeping your feet healthy and preventing foot complications:

  • Wash feet daily. Keep feet clean with mild soap and lukewarm water, and dry thoroughly.
  • Moisturize. Moisturize daily to keep dry skin from cracking, and avoid putting lotion between your toes as this may cause infection.
  • Trim your toenails carefully. Cut straight across, avoiding the corners; visit our office for assistance
  • Never treat corns or calluses on your own. Visit your podiatrist for treatment.
  • Protect your feet from hot and cold.
  • Keep the blood flowing in your feet and legs. Elevate your feet when sitting, don't sit cross-legged, and stay active.
  • Inspect your feet every day. Check your feet for cuts, redness, swelling and nail problems. Contact our practice if you notice anything unusual, even the slightest change.
  • Avoid smoking. Smoking restricts blood flow in the feet
  • Wear comfortable, supportive shoes and never walk barefoot
  • Visit our practice for regular exams. Seeing a podiatrist at our office regularly can help prevent diabetic foot problems.

At our practice, we understand that living with diabetes can be challenging. Let's discuss simple ways you can reduce your risk of foot injuries. We'll work with you to create a treatment plan that fits your lifestyle and gets you back on your feet so you can enjoy the things you love. Remember to inspect your feet every day. If you detect an injury, no matter how small, come in for an exam right away.
 





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